Home Made Dog Food Tips

A common sense approach to home made dog food including low protein dog food, the canine diabetes diet and everyday dog food recipes with a comparison to commercial food giants.

Homemade dog food is a scary proposition for most of us, whether we're about to start or have been doing it for a short time.

How will we know it's a healthy dog diet and we are giving them all the nutrients they need?

Will we balance their protein, fat and carbohydrates correctly?

What about vitamins and minerals? And calcium? (Dogs need so much calcium!)

Relax. Let's put things in perspective.

I believe the biggest reason we get scared over homemade dog food is that it puts the responsibility on us instead of the dog food company. But why should we trust them? Seriously. Think about…

Dog Food Manufacturers

Read those last three words again - "Dog Food Manufacturers". Now read "Homemade Dog Food". One of those does not make me feel warm and fuzzy. I expect my car to be manufactured, but not my dog’s food.

The reason the major dog kibble manufacturers make dog food is to make money. Proctor and Gamble make a lot of the cleaning supplies we use. They also make Iams dog food and Eukanuba dog food.

Nestle Corporation doesn’t just make chocolate. They make Pixy Stix, Baby Ruth, Goobers, Gobstoppers, Laffy Taffy and all Purina dog foods.

And when Colgate bought out Hills, they decided to market through veterinarians since dentists helped their toothpaste sales immensely.

Besides, when dogs get sick or die from those mass market pet foods, do the manufacturers compensate anyone? Of course not, they simply do a recall as if it were just an oops.

Before we move on to tips for home made dog food I have one more thing to say. It's about that little square on the bag or the can called the Dog Food Analysis. Please visit that page.

Enough about them, let's talk about us and I'll give you a little dog nutrition advice.

By making our own canine recipes (whether we cook or prepare a raw food diet), we not only know what's inside our homemade dog food, we have the ability to feed a quality canine elimination diet to find and relieve canine food allergy symptoms.

You might even get rid of something you never considered came from a food allergen, like tear stains - which could be created by something as simple as the food coloring!


What is the Science Behind Home Made Dog Food?

Food is not science, it's nutrition. Nutrition comes from whole foods. Isn't that common sense?

Now if you add the powers of observation, you're doing even better. What's to observe? Mainly energy, skin, coat and poop. That's right, I call it poop patrol and you can learn a lot about it at Dog Poop Health.

And observation comes in because each dog is an individual. Just like some people have allergies, so do some dogs.

And truth be told, dogs are not really omnivores, they are carnivores. I'm guessing this has to do with two things. One, dog food manufactures have always used grains or starches - not because our dogs need them but because they are needed to bind the food and make it into those little brown rabbit poop looking things. And two, starches are cheaper than meat. A lot cheaper.

Now those of us who do the home made dog food thing usually follow using grains like brown rice for dogs or sweet potatoes for two reasons. One, because we need carbohydrates we think they are good for our dogs; and two because they are cheaper than meat. A lot cheaper.

The difference is still in quality. Brown rice has some nutrition where rice hulls do not. Plus we would never dream of feeding corn to dogs only to see corn filled poop and we don't use floor sweepings in the pot. (Uh-oh, I'm slipping backward a bit. Let me get a grip.)

Okay, dogs do not need carbohydrates, especially simple carbohydrates (such as white or wheat flour) make the pancreas work overtime long enough to wear it out resulting in canine diabetes. Complex carbohydrates are another story. Whole grains do not make the blood sugar spike.

There are two types of diet choices for dogs with diabetes. You can find that information at my Canine Diabetes Diet page.

Now if you don't yet have recipes or would like to compare what you have now, head over to my Home Made dog Food Recipes page. It's kind of fun because if it's just you and the dog in your household, you can share these meals.

If your vet wants your dog on a low protein diet, naturally I've got something to say about that as well so go to Low Protein Dog Food.


You Can Do It


By using different kinds of meats (both muscle and organ), serve bones or calcium, vegetables and grains over time gives us and our dogs a variety of nutrients, and that adds up to good things. And if we add a few  supplements at least part of the time, we're doing great.

To see the supplements I use, I explain what, whose and why at the bottom of the home made dog food recipes page linked above.

I know you can do this.

I started out cooking for five dogs whose weight totaled 440 pounds. It was a lot of cooking and there were days I wanted to scream, but guess what? Their health improved so drastically I'd do it again in a heartbeat and I want you to have the same success. (But for heavens sake don't do it with 5 big dogs!)

Just a few more tips before I go.

  1. When you cook or need to reheat any cold or frozen homemade dog food, here's why you should NEVER do microwave oven cooking.
  2. Please read Toxic Food for Dogs. If you can't seem to find the time right this minute at least be sure to keep xylitol away from your dog. A small amount can kill.
  3. And just to make you smile, read Side Effects of Making Your Own Dog Food. You'll be glad you did.


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