Second Hand Smoke
Effects on Your Dog

Us smokers don’t want to think about second hand smoke effects for our dogs. But the truth is these toxins are even worse for dogs and complicate canine health problems. Come on, let me tell you …

second hand smoke can kill your dog

I know you don't want to hear it but you need to.

Because you love your dog.

It's also good to remind myself on those cold nights ...but I'm getting ahead of myself.

Did you really think those gooey eyes were from something else?

Second hand smoke effects are toxic for dogs and cause or worsen any canine health problems your dog has such as allergies.

And that's just what we can see.

Notice I didn't say you should quit smoking? You're an adult and I'm not going to tell you what to do.

Besides, I quit smoking five or six times myself so it would be pretty hypocritical to point a finger at you.

The effects of second hand smoke are worse on dogs than adult humans. Probably worse than on children and we know that kids who grow up in a smokers household suffer far more upper respiratory ailments.

Why?


They don't just inhale it, they eat the stuff

You know that nasty smell that gets in your clothes, the furniture, drapes, carpets and coats your walls with that antique-like color coating? Yes, I know you don't want to think about it, but it is a collection of toxins.

Now to the dog part. The strongest of a dog's senses is his sense of smell. Think about how your dog wanders all over the house smelling everything as he goes.

Dogs are made to use their nose ...constantly.

At birth they have a sense of smell. A week or so later, their ears open so they can hear. A week or so after that, their eyes open so they can see.

It all happens in order of importance. Now picture your dog snorting up all that residual cigarette stuff. Not only does he get it from the air and through his nose nose; what about the particles that land on him?

You know darn well he's going to lick it off himself and probably off the floor, the carpet and the furniture while he's hunting for crumbs in that way dogs do.


How I learned about second hand smoke effects the hard way

Dogs that already have health issues are highly likely to get more living with an indoor smoker. Here's an example.

My first dog Gretchen. That Great Dane was such a sweetheart! My gentle giant played with the cats, got along with the rabbit and followed the hamster around in his walking ball.

I was nineteen and married. There was a lot I didn't know and there were things I should have thought about. A few months after we got our Woo from the breeder, she was diagnosed with mange.

I'd never heard of natural medicine back then and that poor puppy was given strong chemical dips every few weeks to kill the mange mites. Then she came home and sucked in second hand smoke.

It took months to cure the mange. By the time it was gone, she was scarred and 1/2 bald permanently. We loved her just the same and felt lucky because she was the only pup from her litter to survive.

Being too dense to think about the second hand smoke effects on our dog, we puffed away on our cigarettes indoors. Gretchen died of lung cancer at six years old.

If your dog has runny eyes, a runny nose or any kind of allergy, please give her a break. Smoke outside. She'll be happy to keep you company, and the smoke will drift away so she won't have to inhale it or wear it. (Plus you won't smell like a human ash tray.)

And I have to tell you, now that I've smoked outside for many years it's far better for me too. I only "smoke it once" and my clothes don't stink. My house doesn't stink and I breath well enough to exercise.

Funny how when you do something nice for someone else, it comes back to you.

(Dedicated to Gretchen the Great Dane. . . my Woo)



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