Water for Dogs
 Improving Dog Health

We forget about water for dogs when it comes to dog health.  Often canines are more sensitive to chemicals than we are. Let’s look at chlorine, fluoride and how to improve water even on a budget.

Whether swimming or drinking, clean water for dogs is important

In the U.S. chlorine is added to kill disease causing bacteria.

It's also a toxin. While the good may outweigh the bad getting it to our homes, there is absolutely no reason to leave it in there once it arrives!

Added to the other environmental toxins now in our water supplies, we're in a pickle.


Chlorine Effects

Chlorine in water has been linked to a wide range of human health maladies ranging from asthma and eczema to bladder cancer and heart disease. Even the rates of miscarriages and birth defects are higher in areas where chlorinated water is provided. (The last two I found out about years ago when a doctor told me to stop drinking tap water after a miscarriage.)

Partly due to dogs having a shorter life span it is accepted that they are more likely than we are to show adverse affects in a shorter time and since we are what we eat, what we drink is no different. 


Does Your Tap Water Contain Fluoride?

I don’t know who came up with the bright idea exactly but I recently read it was from the same company that came up with asbestos. I kid you not and why it is still in water is beyond my comprehension.

I don't have any idea how they can claim it strengthens teeth when it's a Class 2 environmental toxin, second only to arsenic in its danger as a biochemically reactive poison.

All the years I brushed with fluoride toothpaste I had no idea the primary use of the stuff is for killing rats and cockroaches because it's a neurotoxin.

It was also used in Nazi Germany ghettos and prison camps to sterilize the human inmates, so let's keep it out of our dog's water!

Osteosarcoma (bone cancer) is on the rise in dogs and one reason is very likely the fluoridation of water.



Water for Dogs – What We Can Do

While the best thing for the entire family is a whole house filtration system, they can be rather costly. Still, there are ways to improve our drinking water, cooking water and water for dogs. Here are some options.

They are listed in order of benefits, so the first is far more beneficial but also more costly.

  • A countertop reverse osmosis water filter is a great choice if you can do it. This filters water in several stages. To give you an idea of the power of one of these units, check out the numbers in the blue box.
  • Tap water filters are helpful. They don’t take out nearly as many elements as an RO water filter, but they are far better than nothing. They are also easy to install and use, and may give you filtered water for cooking.
  • Pitcher water filters are cheap and still better than tap water. They won’t remove the fluoride but they will reduce copper, mercury and cadmium while taking out the chlorine.  It’s also convenient to leave it on the counter closest to the dog water bowl.
  • If times are tough and filtering water for dogs isn’t in the cards right now, fill a container (glass is best) with water and let stand 24 hours. The chlorine will dissipate in that time.


When to Give Extra Water

If your dog is on a dry food diet, please add water to the kibble. It’s not natural for canines to eat waterless food and it puts a strain on the system, especially the kidneys.

In fact a dog eating kibble will become clinically dehydrated for about 60 to 90 minutes after eating because the body has to send all it's reserved fluids in for digestion.

For a large dog on kibble, add 1 cup of water. It doesn't have to be soaked up by the dry food.

A little note ...if you think hard kibble cleans the teeth, that's a fallacy. It may be crunchy but it's made with mostly starch which sticks to the teeth.

So if you don't want to feed raw, serve at least one raw meaty bone a week to get those teeth clean. (-;

And of course, improve that water for dogs.


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